Yoga for every BODY with Emily Adams RYT

Have you always wanted to try yoga but are too nervous to take that first step? Or have you tried a class but felt like you needed a little more help to figure out what works for your body? Then Curvy Yoga might just be for you!

A friend asked me to attend yoga class with her for a year but I wouldn't go with her. She was athletic and skinny and I was... well, not athletic and skinny. I was certain that I would be the biggest person in the class and I wasn't sure I would be able to do what was asked. A year later I was still thinking about yoga and finally went to my first class (without that friend!). Attending weekly classes helped me de-stress, increased my mobility, and decreased my shoulder and hip pain. I began to notice and to listen to how my body felt in different poses and throughout my day. I began to take my yoga off the mat and bring more calm to my life. I began to learn to show kindness to myself.

Curvy Yoga is a safe place for you to practice yoga and explore slight differences in poses to find what works for your body. Making slight modifications can sometimes be necessary for proper alignment and safety in a bigger body. It's a place to learn how to use all those props in the studio. It's a place to figure out what to do when your left elbow doesn't reach the outside of your right knee in a twist. Yoga helps you to learn body awareness and you might just begin to understand what that yoga teacher means when she says "what is your pinky toe doing right now?" 

Isn't Curvy yoga just like regular yoga? Why do we need it? Because there are people like me who were afraid to go to a class. Because you want to feel safe. Because you don't know that a regular yoga class is going to be just fine. Because you don't know how to do the poses and might get embarrassed. Because you've tried a pose and couldn't do it. Because you don't know how to make the poses work for you.

Join me at my workshop on January 28. We will explore how to love the body you’re in today, learn “how to” modifications to make yoga poses more accessible in any class, practice the options, and then get a chance to try out those new moves in a 45 minute yoga practice. "You can do this!"

Emily Adams, RYT-200 and Curvy Yoga certified teacher, will be leading this fun, instructional and inspirational workshop. We will explore how to love the body you’re in today, learn “how to” modifications to make yoga poses more accessible in any class, and then get a chance to try out those new moves in a 45 minute yoga practice. Lots of options are offered during the workshop so you can figure out what best works for your body.

Beginners are very welcome; no yoga experience or flexibility required.

January 28th 11:30am-1:30p

Cost $25

Feature Teacher: Nicole Dyer

Yoga means “to yoke, or unite,” to bring together in harmonious union. According to Sharon Gannon, co-founder of the Jivamukti yoga method, yoga is actually our natural state from which we, over time and with experience, drift away.  Much of what is learned through a yoga practice is how to re-unite the mind, body, and spirit, returning to our harmonious, natural state. Once we learn to live in union with our selves, understanding every facet of our own being, we can begin to live in harmonious union with those around us.

One member of the newest members to our Bristol Yoga Community lives this idea on and off of her mat. There is a saying in the yoga community that “one does not practice yoga for themselves, but for those around them.” This individual lives her yoga not only to find harmony within herself and her own life, but also to bring harmony to her community. As owner of White Birch Juice, promoting and educating her community on the value of a healthy lifestyle is a priority, and as a yoga teacher, this individual knows that a healthy lifestyle is not limited to the physical body, but includes your mind-body, emotional-body, and spirit-body.

Not only that, but this individual also knows in order for a person to live a truly, all-encompassing healthy lifestyle, they must also be in harmony with the life that surrounds them.

And this is why we at Bristol Yoga are so thankful to have Nicole Dyer as a member of our teaching community teaching others how self-love is actually a selfless practice.

Here are a few questions we asked Nicole to help you get to know her loving and generous spirit.

  1. What brought you to yoga and made you choose to pursue teaching?

  • Yoga came to me about 4 years ago. Once I started practicing I realized how I hadn't ever really taken the time to slow down and unite mind, body & breath. I was dealing with a small injury at the time, and saw the huge impact my practice had on my body, leaving me with no pain and left me constantly looking forward to being on my mat again. The moment I realized Yoga was so much more than learning poses, or asanas, and much more about loving yourself in order to give love to those around me, I wanted to share that feeling with others. I saw an incredible impact in my life on the way I started "responding" instead of "reacting" and wanted to share this with others too. This whole, new world started to open up for me and that was about the same time that huge changes in my life started (leaving my jobs to start my own business, become a Yoga teacher), and I really wanted others to have that same opportunity in their own lives. I then decided to go through a teacher training in Asheville; that is where I really learned that yoga is SO much more than simply calling yoga poses.


2. What does yoga mean for you?

  • What does yoga mean to me? I am always reminded of a quote one of my teachers shared with me, "You are perfect, absolutely perfect inside, but there is much work to be done." It is the constant reassurance that we were all born with this "blueprint" this makeup of who we are deep down, and it remains there in perfect form. As we pass through the journey of life, it becomes harder to see it, feel it and know it. By practicing yoga, slowing down and being still, listening, we can unite the mind, body and breath to get closer to original form of ourselves. By doing the work, and delving into ourselves for that deeper sense of knowing our being, we get closer to ourselves. By incorporating the poses, breath work & meditation I am able to come to this place of stillness and cultivate LOVE:) Without doing this, for me it is hard to take care of others, or continue to roll with whatever life likes to throw at me. Yoga for me is truly being present in the space between what has happened and what will.


3. Being the owner of white birch juice, how does yoga influence your work?

  • Yoga influences my work with White Birch Juice on a day to day basis. In terms of running a new, small business, I don't think I could imagine doing it without the outlook I have cultivated now. It helps me cope with stress, finding balance between work, relationships & what is really important. Like I mentioned before, I am grateful to have learned this way of finding balance and "responding" instead of "reacting," whether it’s simply being mindful and taking 3 deep breaths before doing anything else, or maintaining morning meditation so I can think clearly and calmly throughout the day. 


4. What are you doing when you're not teaching or making delicious juice?

  • When I'm not juicing, I am either practicing yoga, spending time with friends, cooking, being outside, especially rock climbing. I discovered climbing just this year and have been amazed how it is so similar to yoga, physically & mentally. "Yoga on the rock," its incredible!


5. Of all the places you have been in the world, where is your favorite place? And Of all the places you have not been in the world, where do you dream of going? 

  • Something about Peru, one of the most beautiful places I have ever been. I was there with my best friend from NH and it was just breathtaking. We lived in a small village called Ollantaytambo for several months volunteering. Bird’s eye view of Machu Picchu was probably the most breath-taking view I have ever seen. I really would love to visit New Zealand one of these days :)
     

If you need a little help bringing yourself into union, join Nicole on Tuesday afternoons at 12:15 PM for our 45 minute Flow-N-Go class and grab one of her freshly made juices from the fridge afterwards! The rest of your day will surely be charged with more awareness of your wellness.

 

Feature Teacher Presented by Marcy Hullander

Feature Teacher: Ashley Boyer

Many people desire to begin a yoga practice, but hesitate because of fear, doubt, uncertainty, and/or anxiety. Stepping onto the mat for the first time can be an intimidating experience because of the expectations one builds in one’s mind, specifically about the asana (physical) practice. It isn’t until later in the journey that one realizes this is where the practice begins. As one continues to step onto the yoga mat, becoming more familiar with the physical practice, one begins to understand that yoga is less about the shapes the body makes and more about the connection one builds with oneself. As one’s practice continues to evolve, one realizes that the practice is not confined solely to the yoga mat, that it continues off of the mat, that the practice and the posture never ends.

This is much the case for one member of the Bristol Yoga Teacher Community. This individual serves as an example to all practitioners about the true nature of a yoga practice, that it is more than touching your toes. First coming to the Bristol Yoga Community as a student, this individual, as a glowing momma finely-tuned to her internal compass, chose to follow her instincts and enrolled in the Bristol Yoga Teacher Training Program originally with no intention of teaching. Being a full-time lawyer, mother, and wife as well as a representative for the growing Rodan and Fields community, who could blame her? Fortunately for us at Bristol Yoga, this radiant being chose to take her balancing act off of the mat joining the teaching community.

This joyfully infectious individual is… Ashley Boyer!

Here are a few questions we asked Ashley to help you get to know a little more about why we love her.

1. How did you find yoga and what inspired you to pursue teaching?

  • I did yoga sporadically, as in once a year may be, until Spring of 2013 when a family friend told me about a lady named Victoria Hanson teaching yoga out of her living room once a week.  It was near my house so I contacted her, showed up, and I was hooked. It was totally random, but I trusted it, followed through, and showed up to this stranger's home for yoga.   I followed Victoria to Bristol yoga once a got the nerve to finally go :)  It was August of 2013, and I was pregnant with my second child.  Again, I fell in love, not just with yoga, but with Bristol Yoga Center.  I am twelve hours from my home base, and since moving here, I never really found my niche, my people. From August to December 2013, I came to yoga anytime I had the chance.  I felt a change in perspective in me, a shift, a space that I had never discovered or that I had lost years ago.  At 9 months pregnant and about to pop, I pulled the trigger and signed up for teacher training.  I had no plans to teach; all I knew deep down in my gut was that I needed to know more about this thing and these people that were changing my life.  My husband is the hero in this story as to pursue this crazy gut feeling, he had an infant and 2-year old to handle. Me doing yoga or finding yoga would not have happened without his unwavering support.  I will stop there as the tears starting to form is preventing me from answering these questions. :)
    I pursued teaching after the teacher training because that training gives you a gift.  To keep that gift alive, I have to share it.

2. As a mother, a lawyer, an R&F rep, AND part time yoga teacher, how does your yoga practice manifest in your daily life? What becomes your daily practice?

  • Yoga in my daily life shows up more in the mundane, the day-to-day living.  My home practice is meditation on my mat or in the bathroom when I have a few minutes between life happening around me.  YOGA IS LIFE. LIFE IS YOGA.  It is so much more than asanas; it has changed my life and is my life perspective in everything from changing a diaper, talking to a client about her case and options, leading my RF team, being a wife, a friend, a human, a soul in this world.  I honestly don't see how I made it this far in life without it. 

3. When you're not lawyer-ing, repping for Rodan and Fields or teaching, what are you doing?

  • When I am not lawyering, marketing for R&F, or teaching, I am with my husband and two boys.  They are my world.  Legos, diapers, tents, skinned knees, messy, crazy little boys.  I also love to read and with the pace in my world, I am in love with audible and library books on cd :)

4. What is a book/quote that has found its way to you that continues to hold true in your life?

  • I have too many books and quotes to list.  Right now, I am all over some Brene Brown and Marianne Williamson.  My go-to daily read is the Bhagavad Gita.   One of my favorite quotes that inspires me is,   “You are never too old to set a new goal or to dream a new dream.” – C.S. Lewis

5. What do you hope to teach others through yoga?

  • I never thought I would teach, but teacher training rocked my world and woke me up.  I hope to teach others that the light is within them; it is not found anywhere but here in you.  For years or may be all my life, I held the subconscious or not so subconscious belief that I will be happy when ....(I graduate college, I live here, I don't live there, I finish law school, I get married, I have X number of bedrooms, I move home to Louisiana, I leave here, I get this job..etc.) Yoga, or me finding yoga and allowing it to change my life, changed my life.  I want to show people that if I can find it or strive to live yoga, they too can find that undisturbed peace within themselves.  Come as you are where you are.

If you need help bringing balance into your life or are new to the practice and are just becoming acquainted with your mat, join Ashley on a Saturday morning at 10:00 AM for Yoga for Everybody. This loving momma has a smile that can put any anxieties at ease.

 

Feature Teacher Presented by Marcy Hullander

Teacher Feature: Marcy Hullander

In this spirit of gratitude and thanksgiving we are reminded to give thanks for our friends and family. At Bristol Yoga our Sangha (community) is our yoga family. We have thirteen instructors and each of us play a part in creating a sacred space for healing and personal growth.  All of us come to the mat from different places and for different reasons, each of us seeking refuge in the practice while we continue in the journey of exploration. Regardless of our purpose in the journey, yoga provides the tools for us to continue on our path.  As our journey unfolds we learn that without the presence of community and support there is no foundation for evolution.

The word yoga is Sanskrit, coming from the root yug which literally means to join or hitch together. This joining or union in the practice of yoga refers to building a bridge between our mind and body, a practice of building presence or one pointed concentration.  The discipline of yoga is a solitary practice to maintain, however, the magic that happens when you practice in a community with like-minded individuals is an unfolding. This unfolding happens as we become each other’s sideline cheerleaders. You may have experienced this yourself when practicing in community, as the sound of breath from the person next to you becomes a mantra or affirmation to keep going, dig in and uncover. This allows for a heightened awareness, encouraging each other to peel back the carefully placed layers guarding our metaphorical heart. Through the communion of movement, breath and meditation in a supportive environment we find ourselves together on the path to self-discovery. This work must take root in the place of love as it requires courage and vulnerability to uncover the deepest parts of ourselves.  Those parts that we keep hidden out of fear and shame as well as those we have buried in pain.  The Sangha is our well spring of support for this process, providing kindness, compassion and understanding. The empathetic shoulder for which we learn to lean in to. For when we look at our journey, we realize we cannot walk alone…As Ram Dass says: “We are all just walking each other home.”

One of our sideline cheerleaders, Marcy Hullander, has been with us since September of 2014.  She quickly became an integral part in creating a compassionate space for the Bristol Yoga Community to unfold. Her openness and willingness to hold the space for her students shows in her every day presence.  If you haven’t heard by now she has an affinity for post–it notes and is well known around the studio for littering love notes for all to find. She recently has taken her love for the arts to new heights, exploring herself and her personal journey on paper through intentional artistic expression.  Recently she co-founded Appalachian Luna Love, a company with the intention of sharing products of self – love, healing and inspiration. Check out her latest blog post on the new venture here. Whether she is on the mat or off the mat, she has shown us all the importance of embodying the practice of yoga.

What brought you to the mat?

 

I originally came to yoga in 2011 when I was living in Georgia. I had just graduated from college, finishing up my 13th and final year as a competitive swimmer and moved outside of Atlanta to start grad school. It wasn't really a choice I had made for myself; I was more or less on auto pilot, just following the path I thought I was supposed to, so, naturally, my second week into school I dropped out. I honestly had no clue where I wanted to go, what I wanted to do, much less who I was. Swimming was a huge source of stability and confidence for me growing up, so in this time of uncertainty, I was seeking stability on an emotional and mental level, but I only knew how to obtain that in the physical sense. So I gravitated towards what I was comfortable with and that was working with my body, but because of a knee and hip injury I had incurred in my last year of competing, my body couldn't withstand anything high impact. That was when I found a groupon for a Bikram studio in Marietta, Georgia offering 10 classes for 20 bucks. The Bikram tradition was EXACTLY what I needed at that time in my life. The 100 degree rooms brought the intensity I missed from training at the collegiate level, the format of the classes challenged me to better myself each round satisfying my competitive impulses, and the sequence brought my body into an alignment it had never even come close to before helping to rehab my injuries. After that, I was sold on yoga.  

What does Yoga mean to you and how has that evolved since you came to the practice?

 

Yoga to me now is very different from what yoga was to me when I first found the practice. When I first came to the mat, my relationship with yoga was purely physical. I wanted to push, I wanted to sweat, I wanted to be the best; more than anything, I wanted to wring myself out so completely that I could barely walk out of the studio. I laugh SO hard at myself when I look back at those days, because now it is the TOTAL opposite. Each day my practice becomes less and less about the asana. Yes, I do still practice asanas regularly, and yes, I do care very much about my physical practice, but now, my yoga is less about "how far can I fold here," and more about "how much can I unfold here." There is a big difference there. Before, I would go deeply into postures, but still remain very much on the surface of things. Now, I find myself gravitating more towards meditation, craving stillness, so I can bear witness to my own being and come to see and recognize myself. Yoga to me is a practice of unfolding, unfolding the layers of experience that pile up over time and cover the light of our hearts. Yoga is being humble enough to acknowledge how far you have strayed from your true nature and being brave enough to dig through the junk until you find it again. Yoga, to me, is coming home.

 

What inspires you to teach?  

 

What inspires me are those moments in the classroom when everyone comes together, all are present, and all are practicing with intention. You know it because you can hear it in the breathing and you can feel it in the room. It is amazing what happens when people come together in the energy of mindfulness, and then, watching how it permeates into their lives off of the mat. It really gets me jazzed. Witnessing the way mindfulness so completely transforms and softens people is what inspires me.  

 

How would you describe your teaching style? 

 

Ultimately, I would define my style as my own; I incorporate many different schools of practice when teaching, so you could even call it a blend. When I have small groups, I tend to geek out on alignment principles of the Iyengar and Anusara traditions of practice and focus on specific postures, but I love the freedom and expression of Vinyasa. Yin and Restorative are definitely my favorite styles to teach, because I love to watch what happens when people get still. But in every class my main focus is always breath. I love being a witness to breath.

 

How do you like to spend your time off the mat? 


My time off of the mat is spent pretty actively! I maintain a daily morning meditation and journaling practice, after which follows some combination of exercise be it swimming, running, or asana. If you know me, or have even seen my left arm, you know I have a sweet-angel-muffin-face (AKA dog) named Karma that I love to smother with love. Thankfully, she loves to do the same to me. I love the outdoors and enjoy hiking, camping, or just lying in the grass. I also spend a lot of time reading, writing blog posts for Bristol Yoga and painting, which you can now find my art in the reception area of Bristol Yoga. Most of all, I spend my time with family. I am very close to my family and love them all dearly, so I like to make the most of the time that I have with them.

 

What's been your biggest lesson since your yoga journey began? 


My biggest lesson so far has been ESTABLISHING BOUNDARIES. I feel like I am beating my head against the wall of this lesson at this point. And I know it will not go away until it has taught me what I am meant to learn. As a teacher, I am learning how absolutely necessary it is to take care of myself so that I may better take care of others. I am learning that boundaries are an ESSENTIAL part of self-care. Without proper boundaries, I have found I continue to make allowances for relationships in my life that completely deplete me and then I am left empty. Oh, and, ALWAYS TRUST YOUR GUT.  



What do you want your students to know?

More than anything, I want my students to know that the practice never ends. Yes, we step on to the mat, and we step off of the mat, but the practice goes on beyond what we do on the mat. It is never ending. What we do on the mat is a metaphor for what we do off of the mat. One of my fellow classmates in Teacher Training said this to me and I will never forget it, "We put ourselves in these uncomfortable positions on the mat, so we can learn to get comfortable in the uncomfortable situations that arise on and off of the mat." And with that, the most important thing to remember is to breathe.

 

Feature Teacher presented by Shelly Bullock

 

 

 

With Love and a Healthy Dose of Fear

"Everything you have ever wanted is on the other side of fear"

I saw this quote today in my morning social media scroll. Another inspiring pep talk from the cyberspace abyss. Great advice for some who maybe sitting around thinking and dreaming of what they want in life and stalling right?! Those lovelies might read that post and feel the need to make the extra push, putting one foot in front of the other and make their dreams happen! Cue Eye of the Tiger...(the old school Rocky one with the guitar lead in not Katy Perry)

 "Step out of your comfort zone dammit and JUST DO IT.....Be Fearless!!!"

Welcome the mania, the hustle, the I have no time to look both ways before I cross the road because I have to run. Welcome to the unsustainable state of fight or flight. The above BE FEARLESS pep talk may be the type of motivational speech you want your favorite football team to receive right before they take the field in the fourth quarter but for those of us living our life, we need a more balanced style of coaching.

Guess what follows the mania that ensues after the BE FEARLESS pep talk and self-prescribed hustle? Depression. Burn out. Illness. Stupid mistakes. Regret. The loss of the self. 
The desire to push and make your dreams happen is actually taking more from you than it is making a life for you. The collective notion that pushing hard and moving fast to make dreams happen is the only way to get anywhere is challenging your health. Those engrossed in the hustle are moving too fast to allow for the support needed to make life sustainable. Over time they become disconnected from themselves and from their loved ones. Lost but still hustling...and for what?  The mentality leaves us with the illusion that overcoming our fears of not reaching for the highest of high is more important than our overall well being. The mind, body and spirit scattered like shards of glass on the highway waiting for a rescue crew to sweep them up. Sadly, no one can save you but yourself. 

I feel a little recognized fear is healthy. It keeps us from jumping off the proverbial cliff into the hustling black hole. The emptiness that will swallow you up only to spit back a few pieces to your family and friends. The pieces spat back are not the ones they recognize. Most often you don't even recognize yourself. They are the fragments of the person you once were. There is a time for your fight or flight response, it is what has allowed us to evolve into the human race. However, there must be rest where there is motion. Love for ourselves in the face of opposition. And maybe a little healthy dose of fear to keep us safe from our ego. 

There is a balance that can exist when we acknowledge all sides of ourselves. Peeling back the fragmented layers to uncover the part of ourselves that can see clearly, in yogic terms the purusa or purusha. This is the part of the self that despite our ever evolving life remains unchanged, it is our true north.  Some will say the purusa is the divine within. It is not to be confused with your intuition, the purusa is more like a mirror. This mirror can be clouded or smudged at times by the fingerprints of uncertainty, ego, fear, etc. This is often when we feel disconnected from ourselves or our divine nature, a time when we cannot see our truth or our purpose clearly. Luckily just as we can use Windex to clean the mirror to see our physical shape, we also have "Windex" or tools for the mirror of our mind. Self-study or Svadhyaya is the life long journey of consistent self inquiry " Who am I?" "What am I" "How can I be useful?" This process of self study does not come in the form of a single book, weekend retreat or by liking an inspirational Facebook page. It is the time we spend with ourselves in reflection, after meditation, journaling, spending time in nature, practicing yoga or reading the sacred texts.  It is the time spent away from the hustle, free from distraction. It is where we connect to the divine within. It is necessary and life saving and once the process begins it must never end. This coming back to the self will bring the hustle to a halt. And that my dear IS OKAY. 
As one of the lovelies in my life has told me over and over, "Ain't no empire gonna fall".Know this... It's okay to press pause, it's okay to reflect, it's okay to have a little fear. In fact it's necessary for your survival. In creating a life you dream of make sure you are actually LIVING the life you created. Dive in and reflect. 

With Love and a little healthy dose of fear,

Shelly

Be Kind & Align: A Journey to Honoring Your Body

Something is wrong with my right wrist, and everything I do seems to make it worse, including yoga: especially yoga. Flexing causes it the most pain, and in yoga, we can spend a lot of time bearing a lot of weight on flexed wrists in plank, side plank, wild thing, chaturanga, up dog, the list goes on.  To opt out may seem to have the trappings of weakness.

Read More

The antidote to combat stress in your daily life: Restorative Yoga

Bristol Yogini: Marcy Hullander-RYT talks about the benefits of Restorative Yoga

Why restorative? 

 

Restorative yoga is often referred to as the "antidote to stress". How often do you say to yourself, "If I can just get through this week"? Do words like "frazzled," "anxious" or "drained" appear in your mental vocabulary? Is it ever a struggle for you to get to sleep at night? These are just a few "symptoms" of stress. We, as a society, have become so accustomed to stress that we don't even recognize when it is present in our lives. 

According to the American Psychological Association, there are three categories of stress; acute, episodic, and chronic. For most of us, all three are present in some form. 

1. Acute stress - short in duration and most common; think skiing down a steep slope, skydiving, running late to work, stressing over deadlines, or worrying about conversations had or those still to be had. Acute stress can manifest physically in muscular tension, back pain, tension headaches, and in the bowels through acid reflux, constipation, diarrhea. 

2. Episodic stress - is acute stress suffered frequently. The feeling of always being in a rush but always late, being unable to get organized, taking on too much, and "never having enough hours in the day". Symptoms of episodic stress are the same as those of acute stress but over extended periods of time manifesting in persistent tension headaches, migraines, hypertension, chest pain, and heart disease. 

3. Chronic stress - is the opposite of acute stress. Acute stress comes in short, sometimes exciting bursts, whereas chronic stress is a slow, continual grind experienced in dissatisfying jobs or unfulfilling marriages. Chronic stress is most commonly ignored because individuals become so familiar with it that they forget it is there. This form of stress can manifest physically through violence, heart attacks, stroke, and potentially even cancer. 

Does any of this sound familiar? 

If it does, don't worry, I have already told you there is an antidote: Restorative Yoga. 

Restorative yoga helps combat the ailments that manifest from stress because of the way it engages the parasympathetic division of our autonomic nervous system (ANS). When we are stressed, we are spending all of our time in the sympathetic division of the ANS, in "Fight-or-Flight" mode, or survival mode. When our body goes into survival mode, all essential-but-non-essential-at-the-moment-because-we-think-we-are-dying functions like digestion, processes of elimination, growth, reproduction and repair, (everything governed by the parasympathetic division of the nervous system) are shut down. Restorative yoga encourages you to spend time in the parasympathetic division of your nervous system so these essential functions can re-engage and the body can begin to heal grow and repair. 

One SUPER simple way to help engage the parasympathetic division of your ANS, is by exhaling. 

So the next time you find yourself in one of the stressful situations, close your eyes, take a deep breath in through the nose, then sigh out through your mouth. Observe how the release of the breath makes you feel and repeat this three times.  When you get home in the evening and are lying in bed trying to fall asleep but the dialogue of your day is still on loop in your mind. Bring your attention to your breath, start counting the length of your inhales and exhales, then start to extend the count of your exhales to be a little longer and notice how your body feels as the parasympathetic division starts to engage as you drift into sleep. -

Marcy Hullander - RYT

Check out Marcy's Upcoming Workshop:

Exploring Yin in the midst of Yang 

In our modern, fast-paced society, many of us rarely find time to slow down and, oftentimes, lose touch with ourselves in the midst of all the hustle. This constant state of hustle can lead to fatigue, stress and exhaustion. Learn how to find stillness with an understanding of the Yin and Yang energy within. Join us at the studio for a restorative yin practice where we will explore the koshas, or 5 bodies, chakras, and settle into stillness. Allow yourself the opportunity to reconnect with your true self.  

Sign up here

Find out what a daily yoga practice brought to this Bristol Yogi!

I have struggled with stress, addiction, and depression during my life. Exercise is a form of therapy for me. I love to lift weights and walk my dog, but I have to say yoga calms me more than any other physical training. That's probably due to its focus on mindfulness and conscious breathing, which can reduce the symptoms of stress significantly over time.

 

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Yoga Challenge Complete: We are blown AWAY!

All of us at Bristol Yoga are proud of the dedicated Yogis making their way to class during the month of January. Some of you we see every day, some almost everyday and others at least every week.  Those of you that entered our challenge our headbands are off to you. We are BLOWN AWAY by your dedication! You set a goal, you made time for yourself and you allowed us to be apart of it. Whatever your goal was, whether you completed 10 classes, 20 classes or 30 classes, it is not the amount but the journey you took each day. Making your way to class, unrolling your mat and committing to the practice takes dedication. We THANK YOU, for sharing your time and your YOGA with us. Our January Challenge has come to a close but we are still seeing all of you come to class, taking a place on your mat and sharing in the Yoga. Whatever your yoga needs to be for you, whether we are in a quiet, restorative practice or a funky, up tempo flow, it is all Yoga with a purpose. It is where we find refuge, quietude, healing and community. 

Yoga at its origin means to "yoke", bring together or unite. This practice of yoking as it applies to the ancient science of yoga brings the emotional and physical bodies together to achieve a clarity or bliss. In our Bristol Yoga space we have found this yoking to include a growing community. We feel honored and grateful you have chosen us as your community. Thank you for allowing us to share in your journey.

The light in us thinks the light in each and every one of you is AWESOME!

~Namaste~

Shelly & The Bristol Yoga Tribe

Check out the insights from Bristol Yogi: Daniel Wallen, he completed 31 classes in January. This included a Monday through Friday 6 am Sunrise Class. He committed himself to the routine and the practice, making his goal a reality. We think his insights ring pretty true for most new Yogi's beginning a consistent practice. Including all the ups and the downs he gives us a honest view. Maybe something rings true for you? Feel free to read back through his journey in previous posts. On a side note: The Sunrise Class is growing and we are having so much fun at 6 am it is criminal, Come see for yourself! 

"01/26 Sunrise w/ Marcy

Cues are a key ingredient of any yoga practice. Put simply, cues are the words teachers use to guide students into a yoga pose.

You might have noticed most teachers only use a small number of cues at a time. That's because using too many in a row would overwhelm most people.

Don't get upset if a particular cue doesn't make sense. Some of them still make me scratch my head if I'm being honest. It's nothing to worry about, though. There are a lot of ways to describe every movement.

As you practice, you will start to realize some cues resonate with you more than others. Be mindful of the ones that click most. You might even want to modify a cue by putting in your own words. That will make it easier to remember. Remind yourself of that cue every time you encounter a pose to improve your form.

01/27 Sunrise w/ Victoria

 It's interesting how some people struggle to be still during corpse pose at the end of class. I used to be one of them, but have learned to appreciate the silence, because it rejuvenates me. 

Victoria did something at the end of class that I'm definitely going to remember. She read a section out of a book called “Buddha's Brain.” This seemed to help the people who get distracted  in corpse pose. 

That section discussed a concept called Equanimity. The goal is to reduce stress by minimizing your emotional reactions. If someone cuts you off or skips you in line at the grocery store, you don't have to react to it. You could just shrug it off like it didn't happen. Reacting to every little thing that happens will steal energy that could be directed to a more productive purpose. If you can't change it, try not to react to it.  

01/28 Sunrise w/ Shelly

I'm starting to understand how a teacher could select a small number of poses and combine them in different ways to create a unique class experience.

For example, the Warrior poses could be held for a long time (more than 30 seconds) to create a strong foundation and improve your posture. Those same Warrior poses could be held for 5-10 seconds and combined with a couple of other poses like down-dog and cobra to create a flow style that trains the cardiovascular system. And you could throw in some core movements to make things more interesting.

I used to be overwhelmed by the idea of having to make a bunch of different classes so people wouldn't get bored. It's funny how things can seem so complicated in your head. Now I know I could just change-up things like the order of the poses, how many seconds you hold each pose, and the cues (what to focus on during a pose) to keep things interesting. I am so glad I wouldn't have to reinvent the wheel.

01/29 Sunrise w/ Victoria

This was a difficult class for me. There were a couple of poses that I couldn't do at all, so I caught my mind drifting to a negative place. If nothing else, I am more mindful of this tendency now, so I'm usually able to prevent a full-blown case of self-loathing (a feeling I used to know very well). That might seem blunt, but I think it's good to be vulnerable, because another person could relate with the situation and be comforted in the knowledge that they are not alone.

01/30 Sunrise w/ Marcy  

Whoa, I just made it through 30 classes in a row! The funny thing is everybody else seemed to be way more excited about it than me. That's probably because I just focused on going to one class at a time to make my goal look less intimidating... which totally worked, so I recommend giving it a try – small steps can add up to massive changes over time as long as you can be patient.  

Speaking of small steps, I've noticed that changing one tiny thing can make transitions from one pose to another feel more fluid. Marcy suggested placing our hands on our knees while moving from low lunge to warrior, which made that transition feel less awkward than normal. Don't get in the habit of assuming you need to make a BIG change for things like this. Sometimes a little one will do the trick.

01/31 Yoga for Every Body w/ Marcy 

Have I shared that I'm a very introverted person? I think so, but maybe it wouldn't hurt to remind you. It's nice to meet people, but large crowds freak me out.  

I mention that, because the parking lot was FULL today. I'm kinda proud of myself for not pulling a U-turn and going back home! The yoga studio was so packed that Marcy didn't even have enough space to use her yoga mat, so she just stood up and moved around the room the whole time.  

That was fine by me, because it can be hard to know if you're doing a pose correctly without feedback. Individual adjustments can help you improve your posture and get deeper into a pose. I also feel safe in classes with mobile instructors, because it seems like the teacher is completely aware of his or her surroundings. That's something I definitely want to provide when I start to teach.

 Check this blog in a few days, because I'm working on an introspection post about what yoga means to me. I'll reveal some of the major lessons I learned during my daily challenge. Namaste! "

Yoga Everyday: With Practice we find Patience & Perseverance on the Mat.

We are almost at the end of our January Challenge and Bristol Yogi, Daniel Wallen continues to give us insights into his growing yoga practice. What his practice means to him, how he is evolving in his practice and what he finds interesting or challenging. Check out last weeks insights, maybe you can relate to his growing awareness that this "yoga thing" runs deeper than just practicing poses. 

01/19 Sunrise w/ Marcy 

It is best not to get hung up on the fact that your performance will vary on a day-to-day basis. Since this class occurs at the crack of dawn, it should come as no surprise that the top culprit of such fluctuations is quality of sleep. 

Studies show a poor night of sleep can affect your performance so much that you might as well be drunk. This fact becomes apparent when I find myself getting so dizzy that I almost fall on my butt during a balance pose. 

All of that said, it's also best not to get hung up on the fact that you will naturally sleep better some nights than others. For some reason, I have a much harder time on Sunday and Monday than other days. I started to follow a bed-time ritual a few weeks ago, which has made a big difference, but I still have a difficult night sometimes (and that's okay – the important thing is to improve your average). 

01/20 Sunrise w/ Victoria 

It's good to aim high in your ambitions; but at the same time, I think it's best to turn big goals into small steps so you can build confidence along the way (trust me: this is a lot more encouraging than expecting yourself to be “perfect” on your first try). 

Victoria is showing us some neat ways to woke up to hand-stands in baby steps. She had us set-up with our shoulders against a door frame and palms planted on the floor. Then you slowly walk your feet up the other side of the door frame as far as you can go. I only got halfway up today, but that's okay. All I have to do is take a few more steps every time we practice and I'll get there. 

A fellow class-member named Tang nailed her first assisted hand-stand today. She was very excited, because going upside down is a big fear for her (I know that feeling). This is one of the neatest aspects about group classes. It's motivating to witness other people's progress. There's also an accountability factor since everybody would wonder where I was if I just randomly decided to stay in bed one day. 

01/21 Sunrise w/ Shelly 

It's humbling how you can start to think you have a good handle on this yoga thing, but then an instructor decides to throw a bunch of unusual poses at you to keep you on your toes. 

Part of me hates change. The other part of me knows comfort is the enemy of growth. That doesn't mean you can't relax, have fun, and enjoy yourself. However, true transformation (physical or mental) can't occur if you don't challenge yourself to grow. Remember that the next time you're tempted to glare at your yoga teacher. 

01/22 Sunrise w/ Victoria 

Remember how I mentioned setting the simple goal of taking baby steps forward is a good way to stay motivated? I made that point when I was talking about hand-stands on 01/20. 

That's relevant, because we practiced assisted hand-stands again today, and I walked my legs a lot farther (over my head versus halfway up the door frame this time). My mind didn't resist nearly as much, either. 

If I thought “I'm going to stand on my hands without assistance,” then I would have failed and felt bad about myself (even if I did a little better than last time). This phenomenon is common in people who are trying to lose weight. They get mad at themselves for “only” losing a pound, which is silly, because they would look like a completely different person if they did that consistently for a long time. 

The point? Celebrate every tiny victory, no matter how insignificant it might seem. Baby steps taken over and over again will take you farther than you can imagine. Fussing at yourself won't help you achieve your goals any faster, so you might as well stop being in such a hurry. Any time you get frustrated, take a few deep breathes. You need to be patient and self-compassionate to with yourself.

01/23 Sunrise w/ Marcy

I appreciate the healthy balance of class styles at Bristol Yoga. Marcy's classes always fall on Mondays and Fridays, which is neat, because they are a great way to book-end the week. 

Her focus on the mindful aspects of yoga help you start the week with heightened awareness. And her tendency to focus on gentle hip opening stretches helps you ease into the weekend feeling relaxed. 

Meanwhile, Victoria's classes are more physically demanding. It works out well that her classes are on Tuesdays and Thursdays. That gives Marcy the chance to warm us up before Victoria kicks our butts on Tuesday. Then Marcy provides us with a well-deserved cool-down on Friday. 

I'm not sure Shelly and her instructors intentionally planned their class schedule with these thoughts on their minds, but regardless, the structure makes sense strategically. I enjoy this set-up, because the variety of styles and intensities make the whole experience more fun and interesting. 

01/24 Yoga for Every Body w/ Heather 

Heather is who got me interested in teaching yoga to begin with, so it was nice to see her in class today (she got sick and hadn't been able to teach because of that). 

I started going to Heather's yoga classes at the YMCA during a stressful time and they were very soothing for me. I always left feeling a lot lighter than I did when I walked in. 

It's neat how exercise – especially yoga, in my experience – can serve as an emotional outlet or mental vacation away from the things that are bothering you. It is essential to have a healthy outlet, because poor habits are born when you're struggling with something and don't have a way to cope with it. 

This is why I refer to addiction as a “misplaced coping mechanism.” I don't think many addicts actually derive satisfaction from their negative habits (Note: this is coming from a guy who used to be addicted to several things).

Instead, they are trying to escape from a problem, but fail to realize they are creating a bigger problem in the process (Read: the habit gets so entrenched that it becomes an automatic behavior the addict would feel “empty” without).  

You could intentionally replace a poor habit with a healthy one like I did. The first step is to understand your triggers (what provokes the habit?). That's usually stress or upset feelings of some kind. Next, you would rewire your brain by performing the healthy habit every time that trigger occurred. It takes time and effort, but eventually you should find that the urge to smoke (or whatever) gradually diminishes. 

I talked about this in a blog called 7 Things to Remember When You Don't Feel Like Exercising recently. You can read it here if you need more reasons to get off your butt and go to yoga class.  

01/25 Warm Yin-Yasa w/ Shelly 

It might seem like your progress occurs at a steady pace if you're new to yoga, but I can promise it won't always stay that way. As you get better, your rate of progress will become less predictable. 

You might become excellent at some yoga poses in a hurry. Others might be so challenging that you feel stuck for a long time. I'm not a psychic, so I can't claim to know what yoga poses you struggle with, but I bet you know the feeling. 

It might help to understand why some poses take longer to master than others. It could be due to your anatomy. Handstands and balance poses are scarier for tall people (they have a lot farther to fall). Women might have a harder time with planks than men, because they don't have as much upper body strength. Elderly people need to be more cautious in general, because muscles become frail as we age.

Don't compare yourself to other people in class. It will only make you feel bad about yourself. Besides, your rate of progress is influenced by so many variables that comparing yourself would be an exercise in futility. Acknowledge the reality that some poses will always be harder than others and there is nothing you can do about it. That might sound depressing, but it isn't. Maybe you'll feel less pressure now that you know it's just a part of the human experience. -Daniel Wallen 

"You will never change your life until you change something you do daily. The secret to your success is found in your daily routine"~ John C. Maxwell 

Week 2 Yoga Challenge at Bristol Yoga: Moral of the story = "throw a tantrum"

If you are following the insights of Bristol Yogi, Daniel Wallen, you will be interested to read his latest journal entries from this past week. He has decided to complete thirty classes in thirty-one days for January. He still considers himself new to yoga and this challenge is a way of taking his practice to the next level. Check out his take home gems from his classes with Bristol Yoga. 

"01/05 Sunrise w/ Marcy

I love how different teachers use different genres of music. I have worked with five different teachers at Bristol Yoga so far and they all use music that fits their personality and class style. I enjoyed Marcy's  music so much that I couldn't help asking her to write down the band's name (it was Cantoma if you're curious).

Thinking about this made me wonder what kind of music I would use in a class when I start teaching. I have been listening to a lot of classical music lately, because it helps me focus on my work as a writer... maybe I could be known as “the male yoga teacher who sets his classes to moving music that was composed by dead guys with funny hair.”

01/06 Sunrise w/ Victoria

Remember how I mentioned the concept of reference points in my first journal entry? Victoria used a transition that will serve as a good one. Hero pose is tough for me, but Victoria had us spend almost a full minute in child's pose right before it, and it made a really big difference.

Victoria told us a story about how she was in a big hurry to get to class. She lost track of time, panicked, rushed up the stairs, tripped, fell down, and ended up with a bump on her foot. She called this a valuable lesson about how it is best to stay calm and focus on the present moment, especially in times of stress.

That was relevant to me, because I sped the whole way to class this morning. I was paranoid about the possibility of getting pulled over the whole time. I usually take my showers before bed, but I was exhausted last night, so I decided to save it for the morning (bad idea). After I dried off, I looked at my clock and said some swear-words, because I only had ten minutes to make it to class.

It's funny how little things can seem like a big deal while you are going through them. I should have just drove the speed limit without worrying, because I was registered for this class, and I know Victoria would have given me a few minutes to arrive before she locked the door. Also, I am a creature of habit, so I shouldn't have changed my routine in the first place since I'm fully aware that I thrive with consistency.

01/07 Sunrise w/ Shelly

Today we practiced a movement that will help with hand-stands later (I can't do those or head-stands yet – going upside down still freaks me out at this point). I'll describe that movement just in case that helps you can picture it.

You begin in down dog, walk your feet forward a few steps, and try to kick one leg up at a time in a hopping motion. I hadn't really tried that before. It's interesting how new and disruptive challenges can make it harder to focus on poses that you already have a decent handle on (let's just say my lunges were a lot more rocky than usual!).

01/08 Sunrise w/ Victoria

I've noticed a couple of ways that yoga teachers can help their students get closer to their edge (the maximum stretch that you can achieve safely without experiencing pain). Victoria used both of them today. She had us perform a total of 14 sun salutations with these poses:

Mountain → Fold → Flat back → Fold → Lunge → Plank → Lunge → Chaturanga → Up dog → Down dog → Volcano → Repeat

This resulted in a cardiovascular benefit since the quick pace got the blood flowing and heart pumping. Conveniently, warming the body up in this way can help you get deeper into difficult poses. My hips are far more flexible than they used to be, but they're still a bit tight generally speaking. Today I got much deeper into a lunge than I ever had before.

 

It's worth mentioning that Victoria had the class get into a one-legged down dog before every lunge, but for some reason that makes it a lot harder for me to space my legs out, so I started to leave that part out of the sequence halfway through the class to save myself some trouble. While most people should follow the instructor as completely as they can, I feel there are times where it is okay to modify things based on what you learn about your body.

01/09 Sunrise w/ Marcy

Marcy started today's class with a highly focused segment on breath control. She accomplished this by introducing us to a technique called ujjayi pranayama, which is commonly referred to as “ocean breath” since that is exactly what it sounds like in practice.

I couldn't breathe through my nose as she instructed, but I didn't let that frustrate me. Maybe my nose was stopped up due to allergies or maybe my practice isn't in a place where that is possible yet. Whhatever the case may be, I just breathed through my mouth as deeply and audibly as I could (you know you're doing it right when your exhales sound like Darth Vader).

I recently read a book called “The Willpower Instinct.” The author, Kelly McGonigal, discusses how a meditation practice can improve your willpower. Meditation is all about redirecting your focus back to your breath when you get distracted. Likewise, success is all about redirecting your focus to your goal when you want to give up. She mentioned a neat tip that helped me in this class. To slow down your exhales, pucker your lips as if you are blowing through a straw while you release your breath.

01/10 Yoga for Every Body w/ Shelly

It seemed like Shelly mentioned a modification for the overwhelming majority of poses in this class. I made a mental note of that, because that's something I will need to be mindful of when I am a teacher. On a similar note, today reminded me of a limiting belief I had when I started going to yoga classes.

I used to see props (i.e. blocks and straps and blankets) as bad things. I was very rigid when I began and it didn't help that I was also incredibly self-conscious of that fact. If I was in a class full of people who could do a pose without assistance, I felt ashamed that I couldn't accomplish the same thing. Now I know that was silly, but I bet a lot of people feel the same way. The rest of this journal is for them.

Please don't feel “inferior” if you can't do a pose without assistance. Every person is starting their practice from a different place. The other people in that class could have been practicing for years. If you just started this month, then you're obviously not going to be as skilled as they are. Comparing yourself to other people won't do you any good. Be thankful for the body you have and be patient with the process of making it stronger. Props will help you achieve that safely, so use them if you need to!

01/11 Warm Yin-Yasa w/ Shelly

Today Shelly had us do something fun and unexpected called tantrumasana. We were laying on our backs and she asked us to start beating the ground with our hands and feet as hard as we could.

I can't speak for everybody, but I felt relieved afterward. A lot of us walk around carrying a lot of bagging in the form of stress, anxiety, and upset feelings. If we don't have an emotional outlet (i.e. meditation, vigorous exercise, or a trusted friend to talk to, then feelings can end up festering inside.

This is why I kept a private stream-of-conscious journal several months ago. My life got turned upside-down for reasons that are beyond the scope of this blog, but suffice to say I was feeling very stressed. Writing down my feelings without filter – no matter how nasty they were! – helped me get the junk out of my system every morning.

Moral of the story = if you're feeling down, try throwing a tantrum or keeping a journal (maybe even yell in a pillow while you're at it – I bet you'll feel better after the fact)." - Daniel Wallen

January Yoga Challenge with Practitioner: Daniel Wallen Week 1

Bristol Yogi, Daniel Wallen has committed to 30 classes in 31 days for the month of January. He is diving into the practice of Yoga in preparation for his Yoga Teacher Training at Bristol Yoga this Spring. As a health coach and wellness advocate he understands the importance of daily movement and stress management. Yoga is fairly new to Daniel and he is curious about all hype. Why is Yoga a predicted top ten fitness trend in 2015? As Daniel reveals in excerpts from his daily yoga journal, it is evident that Yoga is not just some fitness trend. It is an ancient tradition of bringing balance to the mind, body and spirit.

Daniel's New Year started off a little rocky with a serious family medical issue. He could have let this stop him from continuing with his commitment to a daily practice. Instead he found that Yoga and breathing exercises (pranayama) kept him steady through the stressful situation.

Read about Daniel's experience, maybe something rings true for you too!

"01/01/15: 2pm Hot Yoga Detox

I didn't write down much today, because my mom has been very sick and that is all that has been on my mind. However, I can say this class was a very welcome escape from all of that. I have an addictive personality, which has produced some pretty nasty habits in the past.

It's been a while since I've been addicted to anything (except coffee)... but it had also been a while since I've faced something so upsetting as my mother being so sick, that it could make me regress (stress and upset feelings were my biggest triggers). I'm pleasantly surprised that I didn't even feel the urge to smoke a cigarette or anything like that. I just wanted to lift weights, go to yoga class, and walk my dog. Exercise is a really good emotional outlet. I look at it like something that refuels me, not something that drains me.

01/02/15: 6am Sunrise Class

Victoria said something that made me chuckle today. She told me to “space out my long gorgeous legs” while I was in Warrior II. I was able to add some distance between them without much of a problem. It felt weird at first, as I'm not used to such a wide stance, but then it felt normal after a few seconds. Maybe my body has adapted to that pose (remember: there was a time that I didn't have anything resembling balance) and now I need to make it a bit harder to get the full benefit?

Also, the fear of looking dumb is a limiting factor for me. This comes out in full force on day #1 of any new class. I gradually get over it past that point, though – patience is a virtue as they say. We practiced crow pose and head-stands, which are not exercises that I'm good at, and it was crazy how noisy my thoughts got when I started to worry about that. I have gotten pretty good at being able to laugh at myself, which is helpful, but sometimes I lose that skill in situations that are stressful or unusual. 

01/03/15:  10am Yoga for Every Body

I can never go straight into down-dog correctly and it used to really frustrate me. One day Shelley told me I should be able to transition straight from plank to down-dog and that made all the difference. My brain might automatically remember flawlessly one day, but until then I am using plank (or the push-up position) as a “reference point” which I always go to before transitioning to down-dog.

Maybe it would be possible to use a similar approach with other poses that are difficult? I'll be looking for more ways to use a reference point to transition into tricky poses." -Daniel Wallen

REMEMBER: The most important thing in our own lives, is our OWN LIFE! Without our life, nothing else exists. We must take care of ourselves: our mind, body & spirit in order to care for those around us. Finding time for your Yoga practice, whether at the studio or at home is a way of bringing balance to this crazy ride called life. 

Stay tuned for more insights from Daniel on his January Yoga Journey

 

Create Your Routine in 2015: Daily Yoga Challenge with Daniel Wallen

The New Year is a wonderful time to pause and reflect. What are your priorities? What needs to change? What do you want to accomplish and how can you make it happen? All of this reflection can be super exciting for self-improvement junkies like me.

I have bad news, though. While an estimated 40% of Americans make New Year's Resolutions, only 8% of them actually succeed. Most people get so intoxicated by the idea of transformation that they forget to make a plan. “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail,” as Benjamin Franklin put it.

Indeed, most people try to force an exercise routine on themselves without stopping to consider how they can make it convenient for their schedule and lifestyle. Or, even worse, they tell themselves they will go to yoga class “whenever they feel like it” (Spoiler Alert: that will probably end up being never).

This would be a good place to introduce myself. Hi, my name is Daniel. I am a yoga enthusiast, personal trainer, freelance writer, and self-published author from Bristol. You can find my writings on popular blogs such as Lifehack, Livestrong, and the Personal Trainer Development Center.

I've been practicing yoga for a few years now, and I still have a lot to learn. I will be getting certified at Bristol Yoga's teacher training program, which is very exciting. I like to be ahead of the curve, so I am beginning my preparation process right now. That means going to a class every morning and writing a short journal entry about what I learned in each one.

Every week, I will compile these journal entries and send them to Shelly of Bristol Yoga. She will pick out the most revealing sections and offer some advice that will help you. In other words, you will get to benefit by having a bird's eye view of my experience. These posts will be published twice a week. If you'd like to be notified when they are available, subscribe to Bristol Yoga blog. Want to join me? Email bristolyogacenter@gmail.com and let them know you are wanting to be on this journey in 2015! You can find details of the challenge in the previous blog post. You have options to make this challenge work for you!

Let's bring this chat back to you and your New Year's Resolution. Most people will inevitably sabotage their success by rushing into 2015 without a plan. I'd like to help you avoid that common mistake by sharing how I am preparing for my daily yoga challenge.

First, I considered my learning style. Some people might like to take lots of different classes to keep things interesting, but I'm not one of them. I thrive with a consistent class schedule. I believe it takes practice and patience to become excellent at anything.

Second, I analyzed my daily schedule. It's impossible to commit to something that isn't convenient for your lifestyle.  Afternoons and evenings tend to be busy, so that eliminated a lot of class offerings. Bristol Yoga offers a sunrise class at 6 a.m. every weekday morning, though, so I signed up for those. 

Third, I solidified my commitment. I did so by sharing my goal in a Facebook status and writing this blog post. Nothing lights a fire under your butt like making your goal public knowledge. You don't have to take it that far if you don't want to. Simply tell a friend about your goal. They will check up on your progress every now and then, which should encourage you to stay accountable.

If you'd like to learn about more ways people sabotage their success, click here to check out my recent Lifehack post on the subject. Don't be afraid to say “hi” if we cross paths in yoga class, okay? It's fun to make new friends. If you found this post helpful, please share it in a thoughtful email or Facebook share.