Feature Teacher: Amy Davis

For many individuals first stepping on to the yoga mat, the relationship to the practice is purely physical. For some of these individuals, it may even stay that way, however, for the others, it does not take long before their relationship with their practice begins to evolve and take root somewhere deeper.

These individuals who feel their yoga beyond the musculoskeletal layer and experience their practice on a more subtle level can be described as “seekers”. A seeker is someone who does not settle for the norm, who does not conform to an externally-imposed standard, who is instead willing to shine bring light into the darkest of places seeking out what beckons to their most subtle level of being. Seekers are willing to take the necessary risks to answer the calls of their hearts’ deepest longings embracing the discomfort that may come from vulnerability, uncertainty, and questioning.

At Bristol Yoga, we are fortunate and thankful to share community with one particular individual whose bright seeking spirit speaks to our inner child reminding us to always remain curious and never stop exploring.

This beautiful glowing individual is Amy Davis!

Here are a few questions we asked Amy to help you learn why her presence is vital for your individual growth.
 

1. When and how did you find yoga and what made you decide to pursue teaching?
- I was very lucky to find yoga when I was still young--I started going to yoga classes regularly when I was fifteen. . . I realized then that yoga practice is a very special time--it gives your body and your mind a break from all of the simple forward, back, up, down of day-to-day life so that you can be something else, something more free like a pigeon, warrior, mountain, goddess, wild thing. Since then, no matter how inconsistent or lazy my practice sometimes has been over the last fifteen years, yoga has ALWAYS been a part of me, a basic fact of my existence. 

I decided to pursue teaching after college. As can happen to English majors, I had little direction and a lot of free time after graduation. I had been leading my friends for years with help from my David Swenson Ashtanga book. Teaching was fun, and I wanted to learn as much about yoga as I could, so I did some research and applied to Asheville Yoga Center's RYT 2000 program in 2009. I was excited for classes to start, but I didn't know that going to yoga school would be one of the best decisions I would ever make. Over the nine months of training, I starting becoming a real person and growing a soul. Teaching wasn't my number one reason for going to yoga school, but once I graduated, I was passionate about sharing yoga with others. 

 

2. What have you learned from your yoga practice?
-I've learned so much from my yoga practice, but what comes to mind is learning how to be uncomfortable. Yoga has taught me that both growth and routine can both be massively uncomfortable at times, but that discomfort is where the magic happens if you stay present with it. I used to hate pigeon pose; I resisted it in every class and had to force myself to practice it at home. Then one day, I was listening to my then-new Fiona Apple CD and she was singing something about being good at being uncomfortable. I thought if I could learn to be good at being uncomfortable, I could rule the world! Nothing would be awful! So pigeon pose became discomfort-practice, and I really sank my teeth into it, and over the course of...say...a decade, pigeon has become one of my favorite poses and a source of major physical and emotional release.

 

3. What are you doing when you are not teaching?
- When I'm not teaching, I'm usually at Kil'n Time! I'm very lucky to have a job that lets me be creative and help other people tap into their creativity (I promise, I will drag it out of you). Otherwise, I like to play with clay sometimes, read, and Instagram pictures of my cat. 

 

4. You are known around the studio and beyond for your creativity and artwork, what would you say your art means to you?
- I'm going to be very candid about my answer to this question! I am creative all day at work, even if I'm not painting something (and I rarely get to paint anything), which rules! But sometimes by the end of the day, I'm usually tapped. One day last year, one of our regular customers saw me working on a canvas painting for our weekly canvas class. "That's beautiful," she said, "but, Amy, what would you paint if you were painting something for yourself...to express yourself?" And I really couldn't think of anything--I spent the next week having a small breakdown and wondering who I was! I still haven't come up with anything concrete. So right now, I guess what my artwork means to me is an opportunity to figure out, as I'm making something, the answer to that question--what would I make for myself?

 

5. Speaking of artwork, what can you tell us about the artwork you are going to be featuring in the Bristol Bizarre Art Show at the end of this month?
- Turns out that something I would make for myself is clay hands, lips, eyes, and hearts for Bristol Bizarre. My friend Case is running the show, and she came up with the loose theme of a freak show/circus. I started with the idea of making clay dishes in the shape of hands with palmistry maps on them, and they turned out really cool! From there, I decided to focus my pieces for the show on body parts. I have hands with henna tattoos and knuckle tattoos (some with six fingers), eye pendants in different colors, lips with lip rings painted on, a couple of feet, some hearts, and one ear. I'm still working on everything, but I'm having a ton of fun with this theme and helping Case get the show together. Everyone should come out! Monday, February 29th at O'Mainnin's Pub from 8-12. 

 

6. What is something you hope your students take away from your teaching?
- What I most want my students to take from my teaching is that it really is THEIR practice, even if they're practicing in a big room with a lot of people. I want them to learn to respect and love their bodies, find their edges, and learn how to sit with themselves despite sometimes being uncomfortable. My home practice is the most vital part of my yoga life, and I want to empower them to have the tools to take yoga home with them and truly make their practice their own. 

As essential as it is for the seeking spirit to explore the burning questions of their inner child, it is equally essential to know how to come home to themselves in order to find the answers they seek. Amy can show you how to do just that on Monday nights at 7:15 PM in her Candlelight Vinyasa class. Join her and learn the depths of discovery that exist within you!

 

 

Feature Teacher Presented by Marcy Hullander